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WWII Story Problem: B-17 x 2 = B-34?
5 Two-Man Teams Who Took on Whole Armies (And Won)

#3. Two Bomber Pilots Fly Their Aircraft After They Get Attacked Midair
It was New Year’s Eve, 1944, and the United States was busy giving Germany a pounding they would never forget. Among the pilots assisting in the pyrotechnics display were Lt. Glenn Rojohn and his co-pilot, Lt. William Leek Jr., flying their B-17 Flying Fortress. When the lead aircraft was downed by German fighters, Rojohn and Leek began to maneuver their bomber into the lead position when they felt a large object smash into them.
Unbeknownst to them, another B-17 piloted by Lt. William MacNab had lazily drifted straight into their underbelly, causing the two aircraft to become stuck together like dragonflies getting it on. Thinking quickly, Rojohn and Leek shut off their aircraft’s engines to avoid causing an explosion and let MacNab’s B-17 engines (which were still miraculously running) keep them aloft from below. … Meanwhile, Germans on the ground believed that they were witnessing a brand-new American eight-engine super-bomber in flight. Yes, Leek and Rojohn were flying the connected bombers so well, the Germans thought it was actually designed that way.

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cracked:

WWII Story Problem: B-17 x 2 = B-34?

5 Two-Man Teams Who Took on Whole Armies (And Won)

#3. Two Bomber Pilots Fly Their Aircraft After They Get Attacked Midair

It was New Year’s Eve, 1944, and the United States was busy giving Germany a pounding they would never forget. Among the pilots assisting in the pyrotechnics display were Lt. Glenn Rojohn and his co-pilot, Lt. William Leek Jr., flying their B-17 Flying Fortress. When the lead aircraft was downed by German fighters, Rojohn and Leek began to maneuver their bomber into the lead position when they felt a large object smash into them.

Unbeknownst to them, another B-17 piloted by Lt. William MacNab had lazily drifted straight into their underbelly, causing the two aircraft to become stuck together like dragonflies getting it on. Thinking quickly, Rojohn and Leek shut off their aircraft’s engines to avoid causing an explosion and let MacNab’s B-17 engines (which were still miraculously running) keep them aloft from below. … Meanwhile, Germans on the ground believed that they were witnessing a brand-new American eight-engine super-bomber in flight. Yes, Leek and Rojohn were flying the connected bombers so well, the Germans thought it was actually designed that way.

Read More